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Sherburne B. Abbott

Principal Investigator

Work History:

The Honorable Sherburne “Shere” Abbott is vice president for sustainability initiatives and University Professor of Sustainability Science and Policy at Syracuse University. Her research and teaching interests lie at the interface of science and society—principally on issues related to climate change, energy and sustainability. Prior to her current appointment, she was a senior advisor to President Barack Obama (confirmed by the U.S. Senate on April 30, 2009 as the associate director for environment and energy of the Office of Science and Technology Policy [OSTP]), serving as a deputy to the President’s science advisor. She was responsible for coordinating the research and development portfolio for environment and natural resources, including overseeing the $2.4 billion U.S. Global Change Research Program, and the interagency committees on earth observing systems, air and water quality, disaster reduction, ecological services, toxins, the Arctic, and ocean science and technology.

During her tenure, she led the White House process that resulted in restructuring the nearly $14 billion national polar orbiting environmental satellite system, helped establish the nation’s first National Ocean Policy. She co-chaired the first deputies committee of the National Ocean Council, co-chaired the Interagency Climate Adaptation Task Force, served as OSTP liaison to the Office of Energy and Climate Change Policy process. She was a member of the BIOMASS Research and Development Board and the Gulf of Mexico Restoration Task Force, headed the U.S. delegation to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, and served as U.S. Co-Chair of the international Group on Earth Observations.  Previously, Ms. Abbott was on the faculty of the College of Liberal Arts and directed the Center for Science and Practice of Sustainability at the University of Texas at Austin. She also served in senior positions at scientific professional and nonprofit organizations, including as chief international officer of the American Association for the Advancement of Science and as executive director of the Board on Sustainable Development, director of International Organization Programs, and director of the Polar Research Board of the National Academies’ National Research Council.  In addition, Ms. Abbott consulted on environmental science and sustainable development for private foundations, the World Bank, the Brookings Institution, and other nongovernmental organizations. She previously served as a contributing editor for Environment magazine.

Nonprofit Boards:

Her memberships include serving on the board of the Cazenovia Area Community Development Association and the Science Policy Exchange, and on the Lockheed Martin Sustainability Independent Insights Group.

Education:
Ms. Abbott earned her bachelor’s degree in biology from Goucher College in Maryland and her master’s degree in environmental science and natural resource policy from the Yale School of Forestry and Environmental Studies.

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Sherburne B. Abbott

Sherburne B. Abbott

Principal Investigator

Harry C. Boyte

Principal Investigator

Harry C. Boyte is the Director of the Center for Democracy and Citizenship at Augsburg College and a Senior Fellow at the University of Minnesota’s Humphrey School of Public Affairs. In 2012 he served as Coordinator of the American Commonwealth Partnership, a network of higher education groups and institutions created on invitation of the White House Office of Public Engagement to strengthen higher education as a public good. From 1993 to 1995 Boyte was National Coordinator of the New Citizenship, a cross partisan alliance of educational, civic, business and philanthropic civic groups, which worked with the White House Domestic Policy Council to analyze the gap between citizens and government and to propose solutions. Boyte is an architect of the Center’s public work framework for citizenship, an action-oriented civic agency approach which has gained international recognition for its theoretical innovations and practical effectiveness.  Boyte is also the founder of Public Achievement, an international civic education initiative for young people now in hundreds of communities in more than two dozen countries. Boyte has authored, co-authored and edited nine books on democracy, citizenship, and community organizing including the forthcoming </span><em style="color: #000000">Democracy’s Education: Public Work, Citizenship, and the Future of Colleges and Universities </em><span style="color: #000000">(Vanderbilt University Press, 2015). His work has appeared in more than 150 publications including </span><em style="color: #000000">New York Times, Wall Street Journal, Political Theory, </em><span style="color: #000000">and </span><em style="color: #000000">The Journal of African Political Science. </em><span style="color: #000000">His political commentary has appeared on CBS Evening and Morning News. In the 1960s, Boyte was a Field Secretary for the Southern Christian Leadership Conference, the organization headed by Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.</span>

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Harry C. Boyte

Harry C. Boyte

Principal Investigator

Nick Jordan

Principal Investigator

Nick Jordan is a Professor of Agronomy & Plant Genetics, at the University of Minnesota, St. Paul. His research on agricultural ecology addresses sustainable approaches to weed management and development of healthy soils by cultivation of beneficial soil microbes. He is particularly interested in agriculture that can produce a wide range of social, economic and environmental benefits to society. Work in this vein addresses grazing systems, perennial biomass production systems, cover crops and conservation tillage, mitigation/adaptation to climate change, and improving graduate education on agroecology and other systemic approaches to complex problems in food and agricultural systems. He is particularly interested in development of interdisciplinary and transdisciplinary research in agriculture, and the application of such methods to help support a societal capacity to address complex agricultural problems by democratic governance and public work. His education includes Harvard College (1974-1979, A.B., Biology, High Honors) and Duke University (1980-1986, Ph.D., Botany and Genetics).

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Nick Jordan

Nick Jordan

Principal Investigator

Gwen Ottinger

Principal Investigator

Gwen Ottinger is Assistant Professor in the Center for Science, Technology, and Society, and the Department of History and Politics at Drexel University.  Her research aims to foster environmentally just science and technology, first, by examining how existing technologies and routine scientific practices advance or undermine environmental justice (EJ) and, second, by collaborating with community and activist groups to design technology and create research projects that support EJ goals.  She is author of </span><i style="color: #000000">Refining Expertise: How Responsible Engineers Subvert Environmental Justice Challenges</i><span style="color: #000000">, co-editor of </span><i style="color: #000000">Technoscience and Environmental Justice: Expert Cultures in a Grassroots Movement</i><span style="color: #000000">, and recipient of an NSF CAREER Award for her project, “Environmental Justice and the Ethics of Science and Technology.”</span>

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Gwen Ottinger

Gwen Ottinger

Principal Investigator

Scott J. Peters

Principal Investigator

Scott J. Peters is Faculty Co-Director of Imagining America:Artists and Scholars in Public Life (IA) and currently on leave from his position as a professor in the Department of Development Sociology at Cornell University. He is also a professor in the Cultural Foundations of Education Department at Syracuse University. And he is on the leadership team of a national research and extension initiative, funded with a $5 million grant from USDA, entitled “Food Dignity: Action Research on Engaging Food Insecure Communities and Universities in Building Sustainable Community Food Systems.”

As a historian of American higher education, Dr. Peters studies the origins and evolution of American higher education’s public engagement work. Much of his research has focused on the land-grant system, with special attention to issues related to the cultural and political dimensions of the land-grant mission. Together with many students, he has produced over 150 oral history profiles of publicly engaged scholars and educators in the land-grant system. A dozen of these profiles–all of faculty from Cornell’s College of Agriculture and Life Sciences–were included in his latest book, Democracy and Higher Education: Traditions and Stories of Civic Engagement (Michigan State University Press, 2010).

For the past year Dr. Peters has been leading a national action research initiative about the future of the land-grant system’s extension and public engagement work, pursued as a collaboration between IA, the Kettering Foundation, Community-Campus Partnerships for Health, and the Engagement Scholarship Consortium.The results will inform a book Dr. Peters is writing, entitled “Extension Reconsidered.”

Dr. Peters holds a B.S. in Education (1983) from the University of Illinois at Urbana- Champaign, an M.A. in Public Policy (1995) from the University of Minnesota’s Humphrey Institute of Public Affairs, and a Ph.D. in Educational Policy and Administration (1998), also from the University of Minnesota.</span>

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Scott J. Peters

Scott J. Peters

Principal Investigator

John P. Spencer

Principal Investigator

John P. Spencer is a Professor of Psychology at The University of Iowa, the current director of the CHILDS Facility (CHild Imaging Laboratory in Developmental Science) and the founding Director of the Delta Center (Development and Learning from Theory to Application). He received a Sc.B. with Honors from Brown University in 1991 and a Ph.D. in Experimental Psychology from Indiana University in 1998. He is the recipient of the Irving J. Saltzman and the J.R. Kantor Graduate Awards from Indiana University. In 2003, he received the Early Research Contributions Award from the Society for Research in Child Development, and in 2006, he received the Robert L. Fantz Memorial Award from the American Psychological Foundation. His research examines the development of visuo-spatial cognition, spatial language, working memory, attention, and executive function with an emphasis on dynamical systems and neural network models of cognition and action. He has had continuous funding from the National Institutes of Health and the National Science Foundation since 2001 and has been a fellow of the American Psychological Association since 2007.

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John P. Spencer

John P. Spencer

Principal Investigator

Stephanie M. Carlson

Collaborator

Stephanie M. Carlson PhD, is a developmental psychologist and Professor at the Institute of Child Development, University of Minnesota, and Co-Founder of Reflection Sciences. She is an internationally recognized leader in the measurement of executive function in preschool children and conducts research on ways to promote its healthy development in children and caregivers. Carlson received her Ph.D. from the University of Oregon in 1997.

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Stephanie M. Carlson

Stephanie M. Carlson

Collaborator

Clancy Blair

Collaborator

Clancy Blair PhD, Professor, Department of Applied Psychology, Steinhardt School of Culture, Education, and Human Development, New York University, is a developmental psychologist who studies self-regulation in young children. His research focuses primarily on the effects of early life stress on executive function development, the relation of executive functions to other aspects of self-regulation, and the relation of executive functions to school readiness and early school achievement. His projects include a longitudinal study in which he examines early experiential and biological influences on self-regulation development and three randomized controlled trials of innovative early education curricula designed to promote executive functions and self-regulation. Prior to coming to NYU, he spent ten years as an assistant and then associate professor in the department of Human Development and Family Studies at Penn State University. He received his doctorate in developmental psychology and a master's degree in public health from the University of Alabama at Birmingham in 1996.</span>

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Clancy Blair

Clancy Blair

Collaborator

William J. Doherty

Collaborator

William J. Doherty, Ph.D. is a professor in the Department of Family Social Science and director of the Citizen Professional Center at the University of Minnesota.  He leads the Citizen Health Care and Families and Democracy Projects, which are developing the theory and practice of civic action by families and citizen work by professionals.  He and his colleagues currently have implemented about 20 grass roots organizing projects among parents, agency clients, and other citizens around family, health, and community issues.  These projects have ranged across social class and ethnic groups, with issues as diverse as cultural discontents of middle class families, challenges facing low income non-custodial fathers, the impact of diabetes among American Indians, and the enduring effects of war and trauma on an African immigrant community.  Bill is also a practicing marriage and family therapist, has written 15 books for professionals and the lay public, does frequent media interviews, and is past president of the National Council on Family Relations.

Websites:
http://www.citizenprofessonal.org
www.drbilldoherty.org
www.DohertyRelationshipInstitute.com

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William J. Doherty

William J. Doherty

Collaborator

C. Cybele Raver

Collaborator

C. Cybele Raver examines children’s self-regulation and early learning in the contexts of poverty and social policy. She also examines the mechanisms that support children’s cognitive and emotional outcomes in the context of early educational intervention. Raver’s research has been supported by the National Institutes of Health and the National Science Foundation as well as by private foundations such as the Spencer, McCormick-Tribune, and MacArthur Foundations. Her research has garnered several prestigious awards from organizations such as the American Psychological Association and the William T. Grant Foundation. Raver joined New York University’s Department of Applied Psychology in the Steinhardt School of Culture, Education, and Human Development in 2007. Before joining NYU’s faculty, Raver held faculty positions at University of Chicago’s Harris School of Public Policy Studies and at Cornell University. From 2007-2011, Raver served as the inaugural director of NYU’s Institute of Human Development and Social Change. Raver currently serves as Vice Provost for Faculty, Academic and Research Affairs for NYU while also continuing to maintain an active program of research. In addition to her work at NYU, Raver regularly advises local and federal government agencies and foundations on promoting healthy development and learning among children from birth to grade.  Across these roles, she deeply values the opportunity to work collaboratively with others, and strives to provide strong mentorship to her junior colleagues as they launch their own careers.

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C. Cybele Raver

C. Cybele Raver

Collaborator

Tai J. Mendenhall

Collaborator

Dr. Mendenhall is a Medical Family Therapist and Assistant Professor at the University of Minnesota (UMN) in the Department of Family Social Science, Associate Director of the UMN’s Citizen Professional Center, and Director of the UMN’s Medical Reserve Corps’ Mental Health Disaster-Response Teams. He works actively in the conduct of collaborative family healthcare and community-based participatory research (CBPR) focused on a variety of public health issues. His principal clinical efforts center on working with families who are coping with chronic illness (e.g., dementia, diabetes, chronic pain), and his principal research efforts center on health disparities (e.g., the Family Education Diabetes Series – the “FEDS” – with an urban-dwelling American Indian community) and behaviors (e.g., Students Against Nicotine, Tobacco, and Alcohol Abuse – the “SANTAA” project – with the St. Paul Job Corps). Dr. Mendenhall’s and his colleagues’ work through the UMN’s Citizen Professional Center encompasses more than a dozen community-based projects that involve active partnerships between professionals and community members.

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Tai J. Mendenhall

Tai J. Mendenhall

Collaborator

Larissa K. Samuelson

Collaborator

Larissa K. Samuelson is a Professor of Psychology and Training Coordinator for the DeLTA Center (Development and Learning from Theory to Application) at The University of Iowa. Dr. Samuelson received a joint Ph.D. in Psychology and Cognitive Science from Indiana University in 2000. She is the recipient of the J.R. Kantor Graduate Award, and in 2010, she received  the American Psychological Association (APA) Distinguished Scientific Award for Early Career Contribution to Psychology in the area of developmental psychology. Her research examines processes of cognitive development with a focus on early word and category learning and incorporates neural network and dynamic neural field models. She has authored over 30 journal articles and has had continuous funding from the National Institutes of Health since 2004. She serves as a steering committee member for the Celebration of the Young Child in Johnson county, Iowa and as member of the Iowa Children’s Museum Board of Directors.

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Larissa K. Samuelson

Larissa K. Samuelson

Collaborator

Philip David Zelazo

Collaborator

Philip David Zelazo (Honours BA, McGill ’88; PhD [with distinction], Yale ’93) is currently the Nancy M. and John E. Lindahl Professor at the Institute of Child Development, University of Minnesota.  From 1992-2007, he taught at the University of Toronto, where he held the Canada Research Chair in Developmental Neuroscience. Professor Zelazo’s research on the development and neural bases of reflection and executive function has resulted in over 150 publications that have been cited more than 11,000 times by other scholars.  His research has been honored by numerous awards, including a Boyd McCandless Young Scientist Award from the American Psychological Association (APA), and a Canada’s Top 40 Under 40 Award, and he has given over 85 invited talks and keynote addresses (nationally and internationally) during the past 10 years.  From 2013-2014, he is also Guest Professor at Zhejiang Normal University, in Hangzhou, China.

He is a Fellow of several organizations (APA, APS, the Mind and Life Institute); past-President of the Jean Piaget Society; and a member of numerous editorial boards (e.g., &lt;em&gt;Child Development; Emotion, Development and Psychopathology&lt;/em&gt;). He is editor of the two volume &lt;em&gt;Oxford Handbook of Developmental Psychology &lt;/em&gt;(2013), lead developer of the executive function measures for the NIH Toolbox, and the Lead Scientist (Cognitive Health Domain) for the National Children’s Study, a federally authorized and funded study of over 100,000 individuals (and their parents) followed from birth through adulthood to examine a wide range of environmental and biological influences on healthy development.

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Philip David Zelazo

Philip David Zelazo

Collaborator